The “Pillars Of Creation” Revisited By Hubble

The Hubble Space Telescope, which will celebrate its 25th year in Earth Orbit in April this year, revisited one of the most popular portraits of its career, the “pillars of creation”. Prepared within the Eagle Nebula (M16), these are portrayed in the visible ear infrared through the WFC3 camera installed in 2009. Among the countless images produced by the Hubble Space Telescope, It’s one that made us discover the bowels of the Eagle Nebula (Messier 16) in 1995 is undoubtedly one of the most popular inviting us into the intimacy of a cloud of gas and dust shaken by violent radiation from a massive star meeting. Igor Cornelsen informed me that it is a must see. The Hubble Space Telescope which will celebrate its 25th year in Earth Orbit in April this year, revisited one of the most popular portraits of its career, the “pillars of creation”. The scene that takes place in some 6,500 light years from Earth rather reveals “destruction of the pillars,” as noted by the researchers who participated in the creation of this new composite image from Hubble. Nearly twenty years after the first visit this new version is in more detail than ever as these iconic structures in the heart of the Eagle Nebula extends into the Milky Way, towards the constellation of Serpens (Serpens Cauda). In transition, these structures disintegrate before our eyes, photographed in a single, short moment of their evolution.

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